MOSCOW EATS: Best Burgers in Town at LUMBERJACK

Lumberjack Bar Burgers Moscow 6I know good burgers. Nearly two decades state-side will do that to a girl. So trust me when I tell you that Lumberjack has the best burgers in Moscow.

Moscow has no shortage of burger joints and I have tried plenty: from the relatively new-to-Moscow Shake Shack, to BB & Burgers (the first two Bs stand for Beer and Buns) – kind of an upscale fast food where they put cranberry preserves and guacamole on their beef, to the mid-range pub Corner Burger, to Goodman Steakhouse, where they charged nearly $30 (pre-ruble crash) for a beef burger and then EXTRA!!! for toppings like cheese and bacon, and many more. Lumberjack is unequivocally the best of the bunch.

First of all, when they say they ‘cook to order,’ they really mean it. Russians are sketchy about undercooking meat, and until the post-Soviet proliferation of western-style restaurants most beef was served well-well-well-done. At Lumberjack, they don’t blink an eye when you order your mean medium-rare. The patty is perfectly seasoned and so juicy, it’s almost like biting into a ripe fruit – I never needed a touch of either ketchup, mayo or mustard.

Then there’s a question of burger composition. While stacked tall with seemingly outsized buns, a Lumberjack burger in fact compresses into an easy to hold, easy to eat package, with perfectly proportional distribution of toppings (my favorite is the blue cheese and onion rings combo).

And lastly, Lumberjack is just a great bar. Now, Moscow has plenty of bars but few proper barkeeps. You have the low-key guys and gals who will pour you a pint, and you have your “cocktail artists” who would like a medal for knowing how to mix an Old Fashioned (though not a proper dry vodka martini, STILL). Neither kind is likely to talk to you. This is what Lumberjack staff does differently: they really engage with their customers, especially if you sit at the bar. They also have encyclopedic knowledge of different liquors, down to folklore surrounding them. That’s how they tempted me into trying polugar, the “legendary” Russian rye wine that’s as strong as vodka – on the house, at that!

And of course, befitting its name, dark liquors, plaids and beards abound. I might not be a fan of Lumbersexual, but I love me some Lumberjack.Lumberjack Bar Burgers Moscow 2 Lumberjack Bar Burgers Moscow 1 Lumberjack Bar Burgers Moscow 4 Lumberjack Bar Burgers Moscow 7 Lumberjack Bar Burgers Moscow 3 Lumberjack Bar Burgers Moscow 5Lumberjack Bar: Bol’shoy Spasoglinishchevskiy pereulok 3 STR 5

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36 thoughts on “MOSCOW EATS: Best Burgers in Town at LUMBERJACK

  1. Russians have got it right about being suspicious of undercooked burgers. They are a phenomenal health hazard. A kind of Russian roulette, in fact! It is very difficult to prevent pathogenic bacterial contamination during the slaughtering process. E.coli contamination, for instance, which is frequent in burgers, stems from the faecal matter, and if you’ve ever been to a cow shed, you will have seen just how much manure these animals produce… and once you open them up… urgh.

    Now, eating a rare steak is not dangerous. The bacteria do not penetrate into the muscle tissue, they stay on the surface, and are killed off when the meat hits the sizzling pan. But a burger, where the meat is all mixed up, the bacteria proliferate happily throughout the whole thing, needs to reach a temperature of 70 degrees C in the center to be safe.

    —— END OF PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT —–

    I so WANT that burger!!!

    • What do you eat there? I’ve heard it’s not the most veggie-friendly of places. And yes, the staff is so friendly and casual, I love that. I just need to break my Lumberjack routine and order something different next time – I ALWAYS go for my fave burger there.

  2. There was this one time that a certain someone ordered a Lumberjack breakfast with pumpkin pancakes. I think going to a place called “Lumberjack” might send said diner into a tizzy. This place looks amazing! Give me a mid-rare burger and a tall pint (and a tall drink of water while you’re at it 😉 ) and I’m in heaven.

  3. Any place that serves a good burger is O.K. by me. You are right to focus on the meat, so many places concentrate on all the stuff they pile on top, they forget the foundation of the burger. And the bar sounds like a treat. People who craft drinks confuse me. Make them and make them well, that’s my motto.

  4. It pains me to say it, but that does not look appealing. Onion rings are a side items, not a condiment! (said with exaggerated indignation)

    But the burger itself looks great! I would eat that any day.

    • Ha! I actually never eat onion rings as a side dish (never liked them), but they are PERFECT on that burger, they add that exquisite crunch!

  5. Well, well, well. I’ve never had you down as a fan of burgers or lumberjacks LOL but I’ll just have to take your word for it. I won’t have the burger as I don’t really like “cooked” beef at restaurants, but I’ll prop the bar with ya anytime! 🙂

    • Are you KIDDING? I love me some red meat. And you can order the burgers there barely “cooked” – it tastes like it’s just been grazing this morning 😉

    • You say “rare”! In English! Actually, first they will ask if “medium” or “sredney prozharki” is ok, and then I ask for “medium rare pozhalujsta” in English bc I havent a clue how to say it in Russian 🙂 Should work at most trendy spots and anything higher-end.

  6. OMG look at the size of that burger!!
    When I saw the title of the post I had to come take a look… I am crazy about burgers and also have visited almost all burger places here in Munich. This is a place I would like very much to try ❤

  7. Reblogged this on ask sophie! and commented:
    Alex, I have to give you this resource. Since burgers in Russia are usually not kosher, I don’t have first-hand experience. However, Anna Belkina has extensive exposure to this question and provides an answer here.

  8. Pingback: A Quick Guide To Russian Food

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